Cooking and more cooking

Featured

These days have been spent; washing dishes, mixing meatballs, stirring sauce, whipping cream, adding spices, mixing dough, more dishes and quickly jotting more directions and fine tuning ingredients. My son purchased some items to make photography easier and so snapping pictures repeatedly has also been part of my daily routine. I am practicing and my kids are helping me out so for now more cooking, testing recipes and more snapping photos. I hope you are all well and I will be catching up this week.

I know my way around the kitchen but not so much around taking pictures of food! So I will take stacks of photos and in the end we will sort through them and start over if need be! Thanks for your patience while I work on this project!

 

Cookbook

Featured

 

dsc_0861_1 (1)I am back on track, working on my cookbook and on alternate days putting my real life story together. My goal is to test all recipes for the book during the month of January.

February will be the month of more testing by my family and friends and a constant effort of writing and editing recipes, taking pictures and deciding which dishes are truly suited for this book.dsc_0613

The other day as I chopped onions and garlic, peeled sweet potatoes and pulled together a fragrant red curry, Sumaya stood watching and listening to my back and forth reasoning regarding the cookbook. I told her that this seemed like part of my legacy and something that I wanted to complete. Thirty five years spent stirring sauces, adding spices, visiting neighbors to watch them cook and inviting people into my home for meals and to take part in my culinary adventures. Delivering trays lined with cream puffs, lemon bars and decadent chocolate tidbits. Taking informal lessons on Moroccan Couscous, Indian curries and Palestinian Maclube. Afterall it felt as if my children had been raised in the kitchen and had become amazing home cooks in their own right. She nodded her head, her shiny manicured nails gripping a mug of curry topped with a large spoon of yogurt. She smiled and clicked her fingertips on the glass counter and then asked me one simple question, “What would you give to have a book of your grandmother Elva’s recipes?” And with her words I gathered new motivation to work on my legacy.dsc_0857

Eggplant Parmesan

wpid-0706152214-1.jpg

I had never eaten, purchased or cooked with eggplant in my life. I really didn’t even know what it was! I bought a Middle Eastern cookbook and started leafing through the colorful pages. I picked out many recipes that I thought looked festive and different. I knew it would be simple to just follow the instructions. So I did, I made meat pies, cheese pies, rice pudding and a list of other traditional foods. I served them to my many Middle Eastern  friends and each polite person asked “Oh is this an American dish, interesting” The first time I told them that it was their traditional dish sfeeha or roza halib the look I got was never forgotten! I had followed the recipes to the letter, bought the rose water, syrups and spices and yet here I was back to square one! I noticed that Middle Eastern cooks used eggplant so I decided to try making something with eggplant. Surely that shouldn’t be too hard. Although I had never eaten it or cooked it I figured it couldn’t be that hard, or could it? I made a dish with eggplant and it was bitter and rubbery! No more eggplant for me! I swore off of anything that needed this vegetable and gave up on Middle Eastern cooking all together. Months later I saw a recipe for Eggplant Parmesan and reluctantly gave it another try. This time it was a total success! Ever since then I have made this dish which I then found out is nothing like traditional Italian Eggplant Parmesan but still a big winner for me! My Arab friends loved it even though it was not a dish familiar to them. My kids grew up eating and loving this dish as well! This experience started my love for eggplant and I found other ways to use it. Many Middle Eastern dishes call for Eggplant and we will explore a few of these this week!

Ingredients

3 large eggplants

1 onion chopped

2 tsp. dry basil, 1 tsp. salt

2 pieces of bread

1/4 cup Parmesan cheese

2- 28 ounce cans of crushed tomatoes

3 Tbs. fresh chopped parsley

Olive oil to saute eggplant

Directions Chop onion and saute in olive oil in large pan. Preheat oven to 250 degrees Wash the eggplant. Cut lengthwise. _DSC1504 Using a spoon carefully scoop out flesh of eggplant. Set aside. Keep the shells in tact and set aside on tray in refrigerator.   _DSC1506 Coarsely chop the eggplant into bite size pieces. Put eggplant in pan with onions and continue to saute. Add salt and basil. Keep stirring and cooking. _DSC1510 Add 2 cans of crushed tomatoes,stir well and keep cooking. Cover and keep on low boil. Stir every few minutes to keep from sticking or burning. While eggplant cooks, get 2 pieces of loaf bread, end pieces are fine. Place on a baking sheet and bake for 30 minutes or until crisp and dry. Remove from oven. Break bread crumbs up and put in with the eggplant mixture, stir well. Add parsley, Parmesan cheese and stir. _DSC1514 Preheat oven to 350 degrees Place eggplant shells in a baking pan in single layer. The pan must have high enough sides because you will be adding water to the pan. _DSC1518 Using a spoon scoop eggplant mixture into each shell.

Pour water into pan around eggplants so that they do not stick to bottom and they cook well. Do not use allot of water and do not pour on top of eggplants.Approximate water to use–1/2 to 1 cup. Just enough to cover bottom of pan. Let eggplants cook for 1 hour until crusty on top. Be careful when removing pan from oven. Eggplants and water will be very hot. Let pan set and cool slightly. Move eggplants to serving platter. Using a spoon serve desired amount of eggplant mixture from shell, discard shell when empty.Can be eaten with Arabic bread, rice or plain. Delicious!